The Bushdoctor NSW

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Blue-banded Bee Beetle Newnes Platues after 2013 fires Flannel flower eastern water dragon

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A. Company Information
BushDoctorexperticeandexperiencepresentationseptember2017.pdf
A document that outlines our skills and expertise.
Bio Filtration basin Glenbrook
BiofiltrationBasinBarnettStreetOct2016finalforweb.pptx
A small basin in a series of bio filtration basins. Client Blue Mountains Council
Columbian Encounter and Little Iceage
Dull.EtAl_ColumbianEncounterAndLittleIceAge.AbruptLandUseChangeFireGreenhouseForcing.pdf
Pre-Columbian farmers of the Neotropical lowlands numbered an estimated 25 million by 1492, with at least 80 percent living within forest biomes. It is now well established that significant areas of Neotropical forests were cleared and burned to facilitate agricultural activities before the arrival of Europeans. Paleoecological and archaeological evidence shows that demographic pressure on forest resources—facilitated by anthropogenic burning—increased steadily throughout the Late Holocene, peaking when Europeans arrived in the late fifteenth century. The introduction of Old World diseases led to recurrent epidemics and resulted in an unprecedented population crash throughout the Neotropics. The rapid demographic collapse was mostly complete by 1650, by which time it is estimated that about 95 percent of all indigenous inhabitants of the region had perished. We review fire history records from throughout the Neotropical lowlands and report new high-resolution charcoal records and demographic estimates that together support the idea that the Neotropical lowlands went from being a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere before Columbus to a net carbon sink for several centuries following the Columbian encounter. We argue that the regrowth of Neotropical forests following the Columbian encounter led to terrestrial biospheric carbon sequestration on the order of 2 to 5 Pg C, thereby contributing to the well documented decrease in atmospheric CO2 recorded in Antarctic ice cores from about 1500 through 1750, a trend previously attributed exclusively to decreases in solar irradiance and an increase in global volcanic activity. We conclude that the post-Columbian carbon sequestration event was a significant forcing mechanism of Little Ice Age cooling. Key Words: Americas, carbon dioxide, Early Anthropocene, fire history, Little Ice Age.
IMCG Bulletin March 2018
imcg_bulletin_1803c.pdf
IMCG DEC 2017 bulletin
imcg_bulletin_1710s.pdf
IMCG Jan 2018 bulletin
imcg_bulletin_1801s.pdf
International Mire Conservation Group Aug Bulletin
imcg_bulletin_1708s.pdf
International Mire Conservation Group July Bulletin
IMCGBulletinJuly2017small.pdf
International Mire Conservation Group June 2017
201706imcg_bulletin_1706c.pdf
Newsletter from June
The Diaries of Gregory Blaxland 1813
gregoryblaxlanddiaries.pdf
Title: THE JOURNAL OF GREGORY BLAXLAND, 1813
incorporating...
JOURNAL OF A TOUR OF DISCOVERY ACROSS THE BLUE MOUNTAINS,
NEW SOUTH WALES, IN THE YEAR 1813
Author: Gregory Blaxland (1778-1853)

* A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook *

eBook No.: 0200411h.html
Language: English
Date first posted: June 2002
Date most recently updated: August 2015